Fixed Teeth Replacement

In a normal, healthy mouth, chewing function is well balanced since each upper tooth has proper contact and function with corresponding lower teeth.  Because of this natural proper balance, undue strain or irritation on the gum tissue and bone is non-existent.  Drifting or spreading of teeth does not occur and oral hygiene is easily maintained. But, this natural proper balance is quickly destroyed when a tooth is lost. 
Missing teeth can allow the surrounding teeth to become displaced. Cracked or damaged teeth should be fixed to save as much of the tooth as possible.
By taking care of dental problems immediately, you minimize the risk of future problems.

  • Crowns protect teeth that are so damaged or diseased that they need more support than a simple filling.
  • Bridges replace missing teeth and offer support for the surrounding teeth to help retain the integrity of the jaw and face structure.

 

DENTAL CROWNS

Crowns, also known as caps, restore damaged teeth and mimics the shape, size and color of the surrounding teeth.
Dental crown may be advised to:

  • Protect a weak tooth (for instance, from decay) from breaking especially after an RCT
  • Restore an already broken tooth or a tooth that has been severely worn down
  • Cover and support a tooth with a large filling when there isn’t a lot of tooth left
  • Cover misshaped or severely discolored teeth
  • Over a dental implant
  • Hold a dental bridge in place

Crowns may be made of metal, porcelain, or newer restorative materials like metal free ceramics. They are custom-made and fitted for each patient in conformation with the size and length of the natural teeth. Crowns typically last five to eight years, but can last much longer with proper oral hygiene.
The teeth to be crowned are prepared which involves reduction of the tooth size (usually under local anaesthesia) followed by an impression or mould of the prepared tooth. This trimming of the tooth is required to create space for the crown to be fitted. The mould taken is then sent to a laboratory where skilled technicians will fabricate the crown. In the meanwhile, a temporary crown is made and fitted onto the trimmed tooth.

DENTAL BRIDGES

A bridge stabilizes the bite of a patient who is missing one or more teeth. Dental bridges are meant to replace missing teeth by "bridging" the gap between two remaining teeth. This involves creation of a pontic (false tooth) with a dental crown on either side. The crowns are fitted over the remaining teeth to hold the false tooth in place.

When there are only teeth on one side of the gap, cantilever bridges may be given. Cantilever bridges consist of two side-by-side crowns and only one is connected to the false tooth or pontic.

                            

A fixed bridge helps to

  • Replace missing tooth/teeth.
  • Helps balance a normal bite.
  • Helps prevent undesirable stress on the dental ridge.
  • Prevents over-eruption of the opposing teeth
  • Prevents drift and tilt of adjacent teeth.
  • Prevents tooth decay in adjacent drifted teeth
  • Retards onset of gum diseases

Bridges prevent the surrounding teeth from moving or shifting in the mouth. A missing tooth that is not replaced may cause surrounding teeth to become unstable and require removal, compromising oral health or change the shape of the face and diminish the beauty of a smile.

Unlike partial dentures, bridges are permanent; patients need not remove them. The missing tooth is replaced with an artificial tooth connected between two crowns (caps), which are permanently cemented or bonded on the adjacent teeth.

Bridges can be used to replace a small number of missing teeth if the neighboring teeth are sufficiently strong. The number of missing teeth, condition of the neighboring teeth, condition of the supporting gums and bone are all important factors which need to be assessed prior to making a bridge.